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Maritime journalists celebrate Lagos NUJ Chairman in grand reception

The Maritime Reporters Association of Nigeria(MARAN), today hosts the newly elected Chairman of the Lagos Council of Nigerian Union of Journalists (NUJ), Mr Leye Ajayi in a grant reception at the Rockview Hotel, Apapa, Lagos.
Mr Ajayi was a former President of MARAN.
In what appears to be a celebration of electoral success of one of their own, the maritime journalists will converge on the prestigious Hotel to honour Ajayi in the company of maritime industry stakeholders who have been invited to witness the epoch-making event.
In a statement issued in Lagos by the association,  the creme-de-la-creme of the Nigerian maritime sector are billed to attend the event under the Chairmanship of Prince Olayiwola Shittu, former President of Association of Nigerian Licensed Customs Agents (ANLCA)
The event is billed to hold at the Rockview Hotel in Apapa, Lagos on Thursday March, 25th 2021 by 11am prompt.
The theme of the  event is ”National  Development: The Challenges of and the Prospects for the Proper Implementation of the Freedom of Information (FOI) Act in Nigerian Maritime Industry “
“MARAN is proud of one of its own, Leye Ajayi who was a bonafide member of the association until his emergence as the Lagos NUJ Chairman”
“Mr Ajayi had served MARAN meritoriously at different times and different capacities as Secretary General and later as President”
“The Association is therefore planning a grand reception to celebrate his electoral success”, an elated  Mr Anya Njoku, the President of MARAN,  observed.
The association said the grand reception and lecture are aimed  to boost the synergy between the Maritime Press and Maritime Publics and Government Parastatals.
The lead paper would be presented by seasoned Journalist and the Editor of the XPRESS Newspaper, Mr Emeka Okoroanyawu, who was one of the founders of MARAN in 1988.
Former General Manager, Lagos Traffic FM, Mr. Layinka Adagun, a pioneer MARAN Member, would also be a panel discussant to enhance the theme’s perspectives.
The special guests of honor expected at the event includes; the Managing Director of Nigerian Ports Authority (NPA) Ms Hadiza Bala Usman, the Director General of Nigerian Maritime Administration and Safety Agency (NIMASA) Executive Secretary of Nigerian Shippers Council, Barr Hassan Bello, and Managing Director, National Inland Waterways Authority (NIWA) Dr George Moghalu.
Others are; Assistant Comptroller General of Customs in charge of Zone ‘A’ Lagos, ACG Kaycee Ekekezie and the Lagos State Commissioner for Information and Strategy, Mr Gbenga Omotosho.
The Chief Guests of Honors are; Chairperson of Seaport Terminal Operators Association of Nigeria (STOAN) Princess Dr Vicky Haastrup, the President General of Maritime Workers Union of Nigeria (MWUN) Comrade Adewale Adeyanju and immediate past chairman of Council for the Regulation of Freight Forwarding in Nigeria (CRFFN) Aare Hakeem Olanrewaju.
Others are; President of ANLCA,  Hon Tony Iju Nwabunike and the founder of National Association of Government Approved Freight Forwarders (NAGAFF) Dr. Boniface Aniebonam.
In addition, all MARAN past Presidents and Executives would be on ground to grace the grand reception and lecture.
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I want to bequeath fully automated ports to Nigerian shipping industry–Bello Koko 

Bello-Koko, NPA MD

Eyewitness reporter

Mohammed Bello-Koko, the Managing Director of the Nigerian Ports Authority (NPA), has expressed his passion and uncommon commitment to leaving a fully automated port system as his legacy after he bows out of office.

Bello- Koko, whose ascension to the NPA’s highest office was as dramatic as it was eventful, said port automation, which is the latest trend in the world, especially, the Port system, is central to his administration in the NPA.

Koko, who spoke Saturday 14th, May 2022 during his maiden press conference, expressed his belief that a fully automated port system will translate to efficiency, low costs, and improved revenue.

In a no hold- barred interactive session with journalists, the NPA helmsman shared his vision of robust port processes hinged on automation devoid of human interaction.

“When I came in, even though in an acting capacity, I held retreat first with the management staff and then the board during which I had to explain my vision of automated port system to them.
“I did this because I needed to get them to work with me and secured their buy-in.
“And it worked.
“Port system is dynamic so there must be a change in policies and focus.
Talking about the legacy he wished to bequeath to the industry, the banker- turned port administrator, explained that his desire is to fully automate the port system which he believed is the backbone of efficiency.
“I would want to see our ports fully automated. Automation is the backbone of efficiency in our ports.
”  It will achieve improved revenue. It will achieve a lot of things we want to achieve. I am really really interested in getting this done.

“We have so much automation done in isolation and we need to integrate them.

“We need to put up something that everybody will love to log into. We need to copy a system that is being used in other developed countries, something that will add value, something that everyone agrees with and that is the port community system and harbour automation.
“I am looking forward to a legacy of rehabilitated port infrastructures with the right marine equipment and that is something we have started working on already.


“Discussions have started in terms of designs, we have gotten the full design of the Tin Can port, how it is going to be reconstructed, what is the likely cost of reconstructing Tin CAN, what are we going to do with some parts of Apapa port.

“We have approached BUA to start reconstruction. The same process is on in the Rivers ports where some of the infrastructures have collapsed.

“If we are able to do this, then we have achieved quite a lot.

Apart from port automation, Koko beloved that he needs efficient and committed staff who are well motivated to drive the reformation agenda.

So he declared that improved staff welfare is another area he wants to work on while in office.

“Staff welfare is very important to me which I want to pay special attention to. All these things are the legacies I want to leave behind when I exit as the Managing Director of NPA” he declared.

The NPA MD, who gave a blow-by-blow account of the challenges and prospects of bequeathing a reformed port process, believed that the core function of the NPA was trade facilitation.

However, he lamented that since the agency has been turned into a revenue-generating agency, it has lost focus on this vital core function of trade facilitation while pursuing revenue generation

“NPA is about trade facilitation.

“The core responsibility of every port in the world is to facilitate trade.

“Until that is very clear, then there was a problem, and then to facilitate trade, that is when other things came in.

“While the NPA has been turned into a major revenue earner for the federal government of Nigeria, gradually, some of our responsibilities are impossible to carry out because there is more focus on the contribution to the CRF, which is fine.

“What it does for us is it makes us reduce costs and generate more.

He then extensively dwelt on the efforts of his management to reinvent the wheel of making NPA more of a trade facilitator than a revenue earner.

“For you to ensure that this trade facilitation succeeds,  you need to meet with your stakeholders.

“One of the things we did was to start to reach out to the stakeholders that were difficult to relate with.

“The port environment is a conglomerate of so many players.

” You need the Customs, SON, plant quarantine, the shipping companies which we do not regulate but are regulated by the shippers’ council and the terminal operators for you to succeed.

“That was the first thing we did and we set a goal for ourselves, which is what are those things we need to do in order to improve trade facilitation.

“It is only when you do that that you start to have a better flow of traffic, shorter dwell time of cargo, and quick turn around time of ships.

“And we reached out to as far as the Nigerian Navy with whom we are able to resolve some issues that we were not able to resolve for over 20 years.

“We just humbled ourselves and decided that we would reach out to everybody.

“We also realised that the modern ports are all moving toward automation, and automation cannot be in batches but there has to be full automation.

“Once there is manual interference in some of the things you do, then you haven’t fully been automated and because of that, we wrote to the IMO to help us consult. We are about to deploy the port community system.

“The port community system is an avenue which ensures that all stakeholders, all the players in the port processes, log into the system of exchange of data and processes.

“The good thing is that it doesn’t disturb the automation processes of individual agencies or stakeholders, such as e-customs and that was why we got the stakeholders to buy into it.

“We are upgrading our RIMS, you all know the problems of downloading manifest and we are going to deploy harbour automation.

“The IMO has mandated all ports to deploy such IT and soft wares by 2025, our target is 2023, maximum early 2024.

“We reached out to NLG. We have been trying to deploy VTS  for about 10 years now but since we came, it was one of the major challenges.

“You can’t get qualified people to deploy VTS, they are very few.

“We wrote to IMO, they gave us some companies which could not meet our requirements while some of them were not interested in working with NPA.

“However, NLG has a VTR in Bonny, even though it is not robust.

“We do not have a problem in collaborating and in the last few months, we have been meeting with the NLG so that they do the survey and put the moles and the sensors around the country.

“It is one of the most important things in the maritime industry now, worldwide.

“We should be able to have visibility without seeing the ship and it would be a tremendous achievement and I believe we can achieve it within the year.

“Our RIM is also being updated and we ensure that people keep using those applications that we have which have reduced manual processes.

“As a result, things are improving, speed is improving. We have been able to block revenue leakages.

“However, we have old ports, we can all attest to that.  The problem with the Eastern ports is decaying infrastructures while Tin Can island port is practically collapsing.

“We have decided to focus our budget on the rehabilitation of those decaying infrastructures.

“We took a holistic look at these decaying infrastructures and came to the conclusion that we need to rehabilitate Tin can, Apapa, and other ports.

Having reeled out his vision for a new port system, he then dared whoever cared to listen that he should be held responsible and accountable over his vision for the Nigerian ports.

“You can hold me responsible for any of these things ” he declared in a measured tone that betrayed his confidence and determination to succeed.

He promised to collaborate with relevant stakeholders and lending agencies to achieve his set objectives

“I will work with the relevant agencies, investors, and lending agencies who are interested in lending, either directly or indirectly.

” Some of them just need a guarantee from the NPA  to hold us responsible for any default,” he stated.
Bello-Koko was named Acting Managing Director of NPA in May 2021 following the suspension of the erstwhile Managing Director, Ms. Hadiza Bala Usman while he was made a substantive MD in February 2022.
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PSTT seeks partnership with NARTO, MWUN to end traffic gridlock

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BUA purchases two ships to improve logistics

Bundu, one of the two vessels
One of Africa’s emerging food companies is joining the shipping world acquiring two bulk carriers to better manage logistics in its emerging business. The company becomes one of an increasing number of food companies that have been seeking stronger control of their logistics.

BUA Foods, headquarter in Lagos, Nigeria was created in 2021 through the consolidation of five operating units into a single publicly-traded company.

Owned by one of the rich men in Africa, Abdul Rabiu, and his son, the company produces flour, pasta, sugar, rice, and edible oil.
The group currently has two modern, automated sugar refineries located in Lagos and Port Harcourt. Originally started in 2005, the company today has over 170,0000 acres of land to set up large-scale sugar plantations.

The company recently has taken delivery of the first of two bulk vessels to augment its sugar export operations to the West African market.

Built in 2003 by Mitsubishi in Japan, the vessel was renamed Bundu after the area in which the refinery is located. Registered in Panama, the 16,765 dwt vessel is 442 feet in length. According to the company, the vessel’s cargo capacity is suited to enhance quick and sustainable delivery of more refined sugar in the face of growing export demand from across the African region.

“As we drive our business for growth with a focus on sustainable returns, and benefit to all our stakeholders and the Nigerian economy, owning a shipping vessel is an important step in BUA Foods strategy,” said the Chairman of BUA Foods, Abdul Samad Rabiu.

“We see an increased and continued demand for refined sugar across the region with the attendant increase for logistics support to aid timely delivery, which is why it is important for us to strengthen our current capability with an own-controlled asset as we advance further in our business strategy. These new vessels will create operational efficiencies in our business and open possibilities for new services.”

The refined sugar is processed from BUA Foods’ sugar refinery located in Port Harcourt. The refinery has a capacity of 750,000 metric tons and is equipped to process all grades of sugar. The vessel will berth at BUA’s port and terminal increasing export capacity while reducing operating costs.

“Owning a vessel to export sugar is a crucial enabler of flexibility and agility in our total supply chain as it allows our customers to tackle time-critical fulfillment challenges due to timely availability of their goods,” said Ayodele Abioye, Managing Director of BUA Foods.

The first vessel, Bundu, is now operating from Nigeria. The second vessel is expected to arrive by the end of the second quarter of 2022. It will be used to promote cross-border trade to businesses across the West African region and other African countries.

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